The Order Garrison

Training my Peripheral Vision  

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Shayen Locke
(@shay)
Woodland Scout

Tsyng  "Shay, what helps you to know what is possible? How about with what is likely? Are there certain characteristics, patterns, behaviors, etc. involved?" 

 

After Kane taught me those three basic questions I simple expounded the stance one to include those two ideas. From the way your opponent is standing and where their weight is distributed there are only a few things they can do. Based on what I know about them and how they are behaving in the fight so far it narrows it down considerably to what is likely. 

For an example, if a person is leaning back in a refused stance and all their weight is on their back foot, their next move can only possibly be a redistribution of weight forward back into the fight. Unless they are gumby man. They could go side to side in a forward readjustment, but it is most likely that they will take the shortest path in their attack. So I can usually calculate where they are going to strike. Not always though.

 

With those questions answered, and if I'm fast enough I can block it or interrupt it. Unfortunately, for me, I usually know where I am going to die before it happens. A few times I have even called my self dead as or before the strike actually lands. My blocks don't yet match how accurately I read a fight. Hence I'm working on them. But really these two questions are an out growth of Kane's training asking the question "What is their stance."    

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Posted : July 9, 2018 6:01 pm
Kane Driscol
(@kane)
Woodland Scout
Posted by: Tsyng

Kane, when you look to see who is in control, what types of things are you looking at/for? Also, are there certain things that you look for in deciding what your target will be? And when you say "what is their stance", do you mean what stance do they have, or is it more how are they presenting themselves in that stance (ie, are they relaxed in the stance, uptight, stiff, etc.), or is it both? Or neither? 🙂

@tsyng, to start with who's in control I'm typically looking for dominance in the fight. Dominance is my term for who is dictating the fight and especially who has dominance when it comes to the sword conversation. I ask who is in control because the person controlling the fight is the person most likely to win.

When it comes to a target my main goal is to go in with a specific place I'm aiming for. If I know where I want to aim I can allow my training to kick in and work my way to towards that goal. I generally pick my target by watching for opening or gaps in my opponents defense, especially the Onion.

Finally with what's their stance, that comes from a study of body mechanics. If you understand how your opponent is sitatuated physically you can infer what might come next. Someone in a forward stance typically implies an offensive mindset and vice versa. Additionally, many people haven't trained their footwork as much as they should have and that reduces the possibilities an average person might employ.

All in all my three questions are more concerned with reducing the number of things I have to think about so I can focus on what I'm most likely going to face in the fight. It's funny because @edward once told me he thought I was really good at considering all the options but in reality, I've just trained myself to focus on the fewest things necessary.

”I think about intuition in the context of fencing as the sum of all of your experiences taking the form of a feeling that something is going to happen even if you don’t necessarily have the evidence to support it.” – Sada Jacobson

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Posted : July 9, 2018 9:14 pm
Tsyng
(@tsyng)
Spriggan

@kanedriscol, that is interesting stuff, and even though I had thought those would be your responses - more or less - I wanted to both make sure as well as have you write it down for posterity's sake 🙂 Thanks for sharing! 

That being said, there were two unexpected things mentioned. Those were the parts about reducing the things to think about and the part about the Onion. I don't know that I am familiar with "the Onion"... What is it? 🙂

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Posted : July 13, 2018 12:46 am
Kane Driscol
(@kane)
Woodland Scout

@Tsyng, the Onion is something I picked up from my apprenticeship with Damian way back when. I don't remember exactly why he called it "the Onion" (I think it had something to do with peeling back an opponent's defense. IDK), but it's referring to the small connection between your shoulder and your torso on the same arm that is hold sword. It's a spot I've always liked to watch since I learned about it because despite being directly behind your opponent's blade, it's actually fairly undefended.

With a basic stance and normal positioning of the sword (hilt by the hip and tip about level with the neck), aiming for the Onion forces your opponent to either block with their foible which is weaker, attempt to block with their hilt which is slower, or strike back which typically creates an easy line along their blade to follow straight into their shoulder.

One of my favorite ways to strike when trying to hit the Onion, is to hold my blade low and to left. Then as my opponent approaches, I swing my blade up and hinge at about 45 degree angle to pop the tip into the shoulder. It's hard to block, if they are quick enough, because from low to high and at an angle on the outside, which is typically harder for people to block. It should also be noted that it's helps to use a Thibault-esque grip that I learned from Dubhglas. It's hard to explain, but you're pinching the left and right sides of the grip with your thumb and the side of your pointer finger. It allows for better hinges at that angle.   

”I think about intuition in the context of fencing as the sum of all of your experiences taking the form of a feeling that something is going to happen even if you don’t necessarily have the evidence to support it.” – Sada Jacobson

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Posted : July 13, 2018 3:55 pm
Kane Driscol
(@kane)
Woodland Scout

Oh and I forgot add that the reason I try to reduce the number of things to think about is because if I'm overwhelmed mentally I don't perform as well. It's like having a highway with a limited number of lanes. The sheer amount there is to think about in any given duel, let alone fencing, quickly leads to traffic jams and congestion. If I want to think as quickly as I can, I have to reduce traffic going along that highway, which allows thoughts, instincts, and reactions to process faster.

”I think about intuition in the context of fencing as the sum of all of your experiences taking the form of a feeling that something is going to happen even if you don’t necessarily have the evidence to support it.” – Sada Jacobson

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Posted : July 13, 2018 3:59 pm
VeronTepes
(@veron)
Terrasylvan Villager

I will admit to skimming a lot of the comments on this, but I think how you were testing the improvement and when to use it to be incorrect. I have found there are 3 types of seeing.

1) You are intently focused on something (Kane you have described this as laser vision)

2) Seeing, but not focusing. to me this is how I normally try to fight. I try to relax my eyes, to see the whole body, and the sword.

3)Peripheral vision, this is what you were testing.

Going through these, from top to bottom, the first, you will see people line up the shot focus on where they are shooting and send a shot. This is easier to defend since you can see where they are trying to send the shot, but their shot tends to have more speed, and accuracy both depth and pinpoint on the spot. Another thing this vision gives since you have more accuracy, is depth control, if they are voiding out of a shot.

The second way, or how I try to fight, I try to see the whole body to see them tensing up for a shot, I see the sword and where it is at, but I can also see their balance, and I can know what way to go to lock up the body. If I'm correct, this is what you mainly use Kane. It is the most versatile, and a the best balance for fighting in general terms.

The third, the one you were training, I find this to be bad for dueling situations, from all you have listed in this. But, in a melee situation this can be fantastic. This is good for line fighting if you can also use the second way of seeing and using the third to see one or two opponents to the left or right, you don't need to see exactly where the sword is, but you should see if their hand is starting to turn towards you, or their eyes/head focusing on you. Further more it expands your vision to see wider ranges, which will decrease kills in the 120-180 degree range, or even less. it expands your cone of vision.

You were testing in dueling situations, which is good for training it, but you weren't training it for where it would be useful, it is useful somewhere else, you should be testing it in melee situations.

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Posted : November 7, 2018 9:13 am
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